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NurseTim, Inc. provides faculty development through on-site consultations, conferences, and webinars. We have over 27 consultants nationwide and specialize in providing completely customizable on-site workshops for Nurse Educators. Our conferences encourage collaboration and critical thinking, and our webinar catalog has expanded to 100+ webinars, including 115+ contact hours. We look forward to working with you soon! Call or write us today at 866.861.2896 / workshops@nursetim.com

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Toolbox Tuesday: Explore NAMI Discussions


Toolbox Tuesday is a weekly blog series by NurseTim, a leader in faculty development and student preparation.

The tools featured each week are mapped to the NCLEX® Test Plan and the QSEN Competencies. These ready-to-use tools help educators quickly implement evidence-based learning strategies that engage learners. Never miss a tool by signing up to get blog updates via your favorite RSS Reader or email.


Download the pdf file here.

CR10: Explore NAMI Discussions

Environment
Classroom
Purpose
Allows students to hear directly from individuals who suffer from mental illness.
NCLEX® Connection
Psychosocial Integrity
QSEN
Informatics, and can depend on focus
Steps
     Sign up for free access to the parents' section of NAMI. http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=Child_and_Teen_Support&template=/Security/Login.cfm
     Do not participate in the NAMI discussions. Do not reply or post in the NAMI forum.
     Review some of the discussions. Report back to the class what you have discovered.
     Would you send a client's family here? Why or why not?
Supplies/Prep
     Internet access.
Budget Concerns
Minimal budget concerns if any.
Comments
You may have a different web site that you would prefer to have students review. Does not need to be a discussion forum. Be sure to review the site thoroughly before you send students.

 

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Toolbox Tuesday: NCLEX Quiz


Toolbox Tuesday is a weekly blog series by NurseTim, a leader in faculty development and student preparation.

The tools featured each week are mapped to the NCLEX® Test Plan and the QSEN Competencies. These ready-to-use tools help educators quickly implement evidence-based learning strategies that engage learners. Never miss a tool by signing up to get blog updates via your favorite RSS Reader or email.


Download the pdf file here.

AS10: NCLEX Quiz
Environment
Classroom/Homework
Purpose
NCLEX® study guides have questions from many different areas and perspectives. Studying these questions is relevant to the learner while simultaneously exposing them to many different aspects of nursing care. 
NCLEX® Connection
Pharmacological and Parenteral Therapies
QSEN
Patient-Centered care
Steps
     Pop in your discs from your NCLEX® Study guide.
     Everyone turn on quiz mode for chapter 12 (randomly selected). You have 15 minutes to take as many questions as possible. Don't use notes and don't look at answers. When I say stop.  You will 'end' the quiz and look at the reporting screen. Anyone who took more than 10 questions and got 80% or better gets 2 extra credit points.
     Hold your hand up if you met that requirement. I will come to look at what your computer screen says.  Then in groups of 3-5 discuss 3 questions that you all got wrong or that were most challenging. You have 10 minutes to do this then we will discuss as a large group.
Supplies/Prep
     Students need access to a computer in class or can do this activity in the computer lab/library.
Budget Concerns
Students will need to purchase an NCLEX® study guide.
Comments
NCLEX® study guides vary.  As a learning activity early in the program, give students options of 2-3 study guides they can choose from.  
 

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Leader vs. Manager



While the ideal is that academic leaders bring both management and leadership skills to the table, the reality is that most leaders in academia and practice have one dominant skill set. That's OK, as long as leaders recognize their strengths and surround themselves with people who complement their skill set.

Leadership without management - leaders sets new direction or vision for others to follow. Without management, that can be chaotic, disorganized, and inefficient because of the lack of planning and consideration about what resources are needed and how to maximize results with available resources. This may result to the use of more resources, increased cost, and disappointment.


Management without leadership - management control resources to adhere to established policies or already established plans. In other words, management does not initiate change but maintains a status by managing resources, planning, directing, the people involved. Management get things done efficiently as planned but does not move the team or organization to the next level.

I have created a table to summarize the characteristics of leaders and managers:
 
Attributes of a Leader
Attributes of a Manager
  • Inspire
  • Motivate
  • Visionary
  • Focuses on processes
  • Focuses on people
  • Empower others
  • Emphasizes relationships
  • Innovates
  • Aligns people
  • Energizes others
  • Builds consensus
  • Might bend the rules for the better good
  • Looks at the big picture
  • Self-aware/self-understanding
  • Challenges the status quo
  • Strategic planner
  • Flexible
  • Risk taker
  • Originates change
  • Inspires
  • Goal setting/strategic planning
  • Has follower
  • Deals with performance issues
  • Ensures tools are available for the job
  • Organizes
  • Coordinates
  • Controls
  • Formal authority base
  • Goal/task oriented
  • Develops and maintains standards
  • Follows the rules
  • Plans to meet goals
  • Imitates
  • Implements the goals of the organization
  • Detail oriented
  • Maintains the status quo
  • Directs
  • Delegates
  • Focuses on day to day operation
  • Creates & enforces rules
  • Has subordinates
  • Responsible/accountable
  • Provides consistent structure

Although many people fill both roles simultaneously, leadership requires a different set of skills than management. As future nurse leaders, hopefully you will be able to recognize when leadership skills are needed and what situations require management skills. My personal belief based on experience is that management is all about tasks and accomplishing goals while leadership is all about people, developing relationships and empowering people to take risks. Both leadership and management require communication, communication, communication and more communication!

We need strong managers and strong leaders. Some effective leaders are good managers while some effective leaders tend to think outside of the box too much to be day to day managers. Good managers may or may not be effective leaders. One thing that is certain is that leadership and management are not interchangeable. Situations and people determine whether management skills or leadership skills are needed.

The literature repeats this idea in many different ways depending on the author: " A manager does things right.  A leader does the right thing" (Finkelman, 2006, p. 17). A great summary point is “a manager takes care of you where you are; a leader takes you to new places.”
Consultation Manager
NurseTim, Inc.